Workplace Demographics


The staff meeting had devolved into a conversation about the relative pros and cons of getting amniotic fluid out of industrial carpeting.  

Pro: it’s clear. 

Con: it smells. 

Pro: it doesn’t smell bad. 

The conversation devolved further into a debate about what it smells like, exactly. Was it that same smell as the placenta? Did you know some people keep the placenta? Did you know some people eat the placenta. Omg whyyy! It’s supposed to have good vitamins. Don’t these people have drugstores?!

The perils of a diverse workspace. 

Since I had zero experience in matters of maternity,  I spent the time secretly contemplating the fact that a solid fifteen minutes of a staff meeting were being spent discussing the efluvia of childbirth. I’d been aware of the fact that my current company skewed heavily female, but I’d never really done a headcount. I began to do a mental count of my fellow employees, dividing then up into different demographics. 

Considering that I work in the entertainment industry in an office offering financial services, one might expect the usual complaints about gender disparity and racial white-washing, yet somehow I managed to land at a company which falls into neither of these stereotypes. It’s not a big company: maybe twenty five employees if you count the receptionist who is a temp. But it’s more than seventy five percent women and white folk only account for about a fifth of the employees, including me, and including the temp receptionist. Another fifth is Latino. The largest demographic, although not a true overall majority, is Asian. The smallest group is African American, but only by one or two individuals. 

So with all the discouraging reports of poor representation for women and for people of color, it was pleasantly edifying to realize that diverse companies do actually exist. 

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~ by Gwydhar Gebien on June 22, 2017.

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